Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

6 Careers for Those Who Love to Travel

Travel Careers

More people are thinking global when it comes to choosing a career.

Having a mobile career can be hugely attractive – specifically for avid travelers and people that love the thrill of visiting a new place and immersing in a different culture.

More and more people are thinking global when it comes to finding the ideal career. Thanks to the rapid growth of international business and travel, there’s a broad range of careers that involve travelling and/or working overseas.

Pilot

Being a pilot is both mentally and physically exhausting, but it can be the perfect career for those who enjoy traveling.

According to U.S. manufacturer Boeing, the global aviation industry will need to arm itself with half a million new pilots over the next twenty years to satisfy the surging demand for international travel. For those who enjoy flying, job opportunities are expected to be plentiful, particularly in emerging economic powerhouses in Asia and cash-rich countries in the Middle East.

In order to become a pilot, you need to obtain a degree/diploma from an aviation college and earn a Commercial Pilot License (CPL) from Transport Canada.

Chef

If food and travel encompasses your version of a dream job, look no further and become a chef.

It’s common for talented chefs to move around and work for or launch a variety of restaurants in different countries. Those who are able to secure positions in popular, well-established restaurants can command a six-figure income.

If cooking is your calling, you should attend a technical institution that offers a culinary program. The most successful chefs are well-disciplined, creative, decisive, and can handle verbal assaults that echo Gordon Ramsay.

Overseas English Teacher

With business going global and more people traveling than ever before, the need for a common language to facilitate open and effective communication has become necessary – and English has emerged the victor.

This profession is perfect for the budding traveler who likes to get to know a new culture up close.

If English is your native language, you can start by completing the TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) program. Compensation varies, depending on the country (Asia and the Middle East pay the highest) and setting (wealthy private schools offer a more competitive salary)

Sales

Salespeople do a significant amount of traveling (that’s why there are tax deductions for food, lodging, and airfare). Large companies that have a global presence offer excellent travel opportunities for those passionate about sales.

In order to succeed as an international salesperson, you must have excellent communication skills, be self-motivated, and have the ability to approach complete strangers with confidence and professionalism. You must also know how to adapt to local customs and have a knack for developing relationships with people of different cultural backgrounds.

While these attributes can excuse the lack of a university degree, it can be beneficial to obtain one in order to move into a managerial role.

Accountant

The accounting profession is sometimes viewed as drab, repetitive, and the last place to inquire about if looking for a travel-oriented career.

Surprisingly, there’s a fair amount of globe-trotting involved for accountants – especially for those who work for large public accounting firms. Senior auditors enjoy dynamic and ever-changing work environments that offer challenge, a great salary, a rotating roster of interesting clients, and the ability to travel to a variety of destinations. Who says that accounting is boring?

The necessary steps to landing an accounting career include obtaining a university degree and working towards a professional designation, such as the prestigious and sought-after CA (Chartered Accountant).

Journalist

Journalism can open the door to an immensely satisfying travel-oriented career filled with challenge, diversity, excitement, and adventure. Talented and self-motivated journalists often scour the globe, doing research on a plethora of intriguing stories, conducting interviews with a wide assortment of people, taking photographs that grace the front page of a major newspaper, and, if lucky, personally reporting on once in-a-lifetime events that make history.

To become a successful foreign journalist, major in journalism or communications in college. The proper experience is also vital; start by working for local broadcasting stations and magazines, writing for your school newspaper, and doing an internship with a news organization.

Marek Gregorski
Author: Marek Gregorski
Marek Gregorski is a freelance writer based in Edmonton.
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